Sunday, February 17, 2008

"Hope"

The new Laini's Ladies I'm designing now, you can probably tell by this one, are for the Christmas '08 line. If it seems a little early to be doing this, it's actually really late! Many gift companies are already showing their holiday lines now. But -- ULP! -- I've been really busy, and so have the folks at the Bottman Company, so we're just now getting to these. No worries, though. Plenty of time to unveil them at the summer gift shows, which is -- I imagine -- when more stores are thinking about holiday orders.

The quote that will be on the one above is: "Everything that is done in the world is done by hope." -- Martin Luther. I ask this sincerely: is Martin Luther an okay guy to quote? I mean, I know a little about him, I know he kicked off the Protestant Reformation and translated the Bible into German and started the practice of marriage in the clergy, and preached against the sale of indulgences, etc etc. All good things. But I also saw a reference to his legacy being tainted by his anti-semitism. So, I'm wondering: what is his legacy? Is putting his words and name on a Laini's Lady a bad thing? Thoughts? How is this guy thought of today?

Also, I thought it would be interesting to show you how Laini's Ladies start out. Here's the first step:
Well, second step, really. First is itty bitty thumbnail drawings. Then, this drawing here gets scanned in and I do the collage digitally, with prepared color swatches, patterns, face, etc. Such humble beginnings!

And on an unrelated design note, would you like to see some design wonderfulness? First of all, do you know Maryam at Marrakesh? She's a blogger who lives in Morrocco, and she and her architect husband have been busy building a pleasure palace called "Peacock Pavilions" -- a fairy tale of a small guesthouse set in olive orchards prowled by peacocks. You can read (and drool) all about that and Maryam's jealous-making business and shopping trips all over Africa and Asia on her blog. And now I read, an amazing decorative designer, Melanie at design amour, has asked permission for a group of painters to go to Peacock Pavilions and paint -- for free -- amazing decorative flourishes (inspired by Maryam's antique suzanni collection) on the walls! I don't really know what I'm more jealous of: Maryam's paradise, or Melanie's painting trips! Each year, apparently, she and a group of painters select a lucky property and offer their services, then they go on an exotic painting holiday! OH. MY. GOD. Okay, I guess I'm slightly more jealous of Maryam (just wait until you get lost in her blog), but it's close! Enjoy these two eye-candy treats!

Some day, when Peacock Pavilions is all finished, Jim and I will go to Marrakesh, and we will shop and we will eat and we will draw, and we will stay there in Maryam's olive grove, and we will see those paintings for ourselves! Sigh.

20 comments:

Maribeth Kayla said...

Cool! I really like the Laini's ladies. And that a really cool blog; I can see why you're jealous. ;)

Maribeth Kayla said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alysa said...

Totally ok to quote Martin Luther. It is a nice quote, and I've only ever heard the good things about him. :)

Erin said...

Definitely quote Martin Luther. :)

Alexandra S said...

Beautiful new lady! I've thought it would be a really neat idea to have painters paint or donate their art to orphanages. Remember how depressing the one was in Tsareva Levada? the chipping wall paint, rows of beds, etc. All throughout E Europe, and I'm sure the world, are these big, soulless buildings housing children without any family or art to help feed their souls. I feel very lucky to be surrounded everywhere I look by the art of my favorite artist! (that would be the artist, Moses Turpentine, of course!)

Kim G. said...

I love the Lady and the quote seems so appropriate for our times. There are no perfect people in this world and we have all probably said and done things that we've regretted in our lives. I'd like to think that Luther might have one day had a change of heart if he did have prejudices that influenced him. We are all a work in progress - I know I am!

Q said...

I think that the quote fits with what you are trying to express with your beautiful piece, and that Martin Luther was a predominantly good man who wanted good in this world. Everyone does have their flaws. I don't think that his alleged anti-semitism it would hurt the sales or meaning of this Lady very much, if at all, nor would it offend many people, if anyone. Use the quote.

myrna said...

This is my first time commenting, but I wanted to congratulate you on your "gummy bear" and on finishing your draft of Silksinger! My third little darling turned nine-months-old today. She's wiggling all over my lap and chewing on my thumb. They are so much fun!

And I wanted to thank you for writing "Not for Robots;" it was helpful and encouraging. My library doesn't have Blackbringer, but I'm going to order it. I love your blog!
And I like the Lady and the quote.

Maryam in Marrakesh said...

Thank you so much, Laini, for your really lovely post!!! I am so flattered. We can't wait for you and Jim to come out to Peacock Pavilions!!!! (And yes, Melanie's work is amazing and I am amazingly lucky!!!)

xo

Rebecca Schosha said...

From Wikipedia (not always the most reliable of sources), but in this case they are correct...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_luther

I don't think anyone will get on you for using a quote of his, though. The librarian in me just feels obligated to point out the truth.

I'm sorry!


"Much scholarly debate has concentrated on Luther's writings about the Jews. His statements that Jews' homes should be destroyed, their synagogues burned, money confiscated and liberty curtailed were revived and used in propaganda by the Nazis in 1933–45.[8] As a result of this and his revolutionary theological views, his legacy remains controversial.[9]"

Caty said...

I never read or heard anything like this...Martin Luther sying anything againts jews or anyone actually...

I should say that wikipedia is not a good source. People do not check sources there...and anyone can write.

I would look for the direct source not a commentary as the one shown above.

But what I came specially to tell you here is that finally I have your book!!!!! "Blackbringer" ! I can't wait to go home and start reading it :)

The new fairy is beautiful! Do you design the papers?

nonizamboni said...

Such a beautiful design! And my take on Luther's quote for me is the word 'hope' --essential and well,...'hopeful.' Besides, that is one of Viktor Frankel's biggest gifts to us when he explained why some took their life in the concentration camps and others didn't--they had hope.
Thanks for sharing

Frida said...

hey - we need to talk - alexandra and laini and bossy little old me, that is. i've been talking to swirly about the idea of connecting artists to social justice/ development projects. like painting in orphanages - so if our great minds are thinking alike then there may be something in it!

i love the luther quote but don't know enough about him to know if he has any nasty skeletons in the cupboard...

Rebecca Schosha said...

http://www.humanitas-international.org/showcase/chronography/documents/luther-jews.htm

Above you will find a link to an academic site that provides a translation of one of Luther's documents - and what he had to say about Jews.

I'm Jewish, but I do not find Laini's use of a Luther quotes problematic. Truly. I love Laini's work, and, while I wouldn't personally purchase that particular ornament, I would certainly collect the other beautiful pieces in her collection!

I do feel compelled, however, to respond and provide the facts since Laini asked - and since so many of you are contesting an important historical fact. It's a piece of history folks should be aware of.

Finally, I do take issue with anyone who compares (in a positive way) the amazing and inspiring Holocaust survivor, Viktor Frankl, and Martin Luther. One preached tolerance (and against the concept of collective guilt), and the other preached uncompromising hate against an entire group.

I promise not to say any more about this. I don't want to turn this amazing and inspiring blog into fight scene over religion and history.

Sorry, Laini!

Sustenance Scout said...

Terrific recent posts, Laini! I'm always so glad when I stop by. Since that Lady is so so so lovely and Martin Luther is controversial, I'd opt for another hope quote. Just my two cents. I'm thankful for the comments regarding Martin Luther and Victor Frankl and look forward to doing more research on both men. Thanks! K.

Caty said...

(sorry Laini to answer to Rebecca here...she doesn't have a blog it seems...)

Rebecca, I am not contesting the importance of an "historical fact". I just would like to know more. The link you show is a "translation" ? from english...? I will look for the original talk. And thank you for telling us this. it is an important subjet. I am not jew, I have friends that are.

Caty said...

who are..sorry my english is not so good.......

brittany said...

wow, it stirred up a bit more passion than I would have thought! But what I was going to say was that it is a nice quote and from the mostly surfacy things I have known about Martin Luther, I wouldn't see quoting him negaive at all.

How cool that you are officially invited to Peacock Pavillion.

How do you do the face of the Ladies? Is it a collage of an existing pretty face? very intriguing indeed.

Gomomyourock said...

I was so excited yesterday when I walked into one of our local staionery stores and saw your ladies! I squealed with glee and got a strange look from the clerk!

Glad to know you're out here too!

davesap said...

I highly doubt that many people would take offense at a quotation about hope from Martin Luther, particularly on a Christmas ornament. I too would hope that his views about Jews would have evolved, but appreciate the education on his legacy from Rebecca.